Author Topic: vegetative cycle of eggplants  (Read 13643 times)

Offline teri

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vegetative cycle of eggplants
« on: December 11, 2005, 05:01:04 pm »
Hi,
I'm really interested in information on the vegetative cycle of eggplants from germination to the flowering stage in tropical countries.
Pictures would be a bonus....

Teri

Offline Sunny Gardens®

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Re: vegetative cycle of eggplants
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2005, 12:15:50 am »
Eggplant

An eggplant, aubergine or brinjal is either of two species of nightshade, Solanum melongena and S. esculentum, bearing large pendulous purple or white fruit.

It originated in India but has also been cultivated in China and Central Asian countries since prehistory. Eggplant appears to have been known to the Western world no more than about 1,500 years ago. The numerous Arabic and North African names for it, and the lack of ancient Greek and Roman names, indicate that it was carried into the Mediterranean area by the Arabs in the early Middle Ages. Melongena, part of the scientific name, was a 16th-century Arabic name for one kind of eggplant.

The raw fruit has a somewhat disagreeable taste, but on cooking becomes tender and develops a rich, complex flavor and firm texture. It is especially useful culinarily owing to its ability to absorb great amounts of cooking fats, making possible extraordinarily rich dishes.
 
The variety that closely resembles a chicken egg in both size and shape is commonly known today as the Indian eggplant. The most-widely cultivated varieties in Europe and North America today are of similar shape but both larger and darker. Chinese eggplant is shaped like a narrower, slightly pendulous cucumber. Many eggplants sometimes have a color gradient, from white at the stem to bright purple to deep purple, but albino varieties also exist. The name 'eggplant' dates to the 1700s, when the most common European variety of the fruit was white or yellow, and roughly the size and shape of a goose egg.

Aubergine is the British name given to this fruit. This name comes from the French aubergine, derived from Catalan albergínia, from Arabic al-bAdhinjAn, from Persian بادنجان Bâdinjân, the eggplant.

The word melongena is from the Sanskrit vatinganah, which has produced a number of names for this plant in various languages: brinjal, badingan, melongena, melanzana, berenjena, albergínia, aubergine, brown-jolly, and mad-apple (misinterpretation of Italian melanzana as mela insana).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggplant
« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 12:34:32 am by Peter Gibbons »
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Offline Sunny Gardens®

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Re: vegetative cycle of eggplants
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2005, 12:21:25 am »
Thai Eggplant

The Thai eggplant (Thai: มะเขือ ma keua) is a variety of eggplant used primarily in Thai cuisine. The most common eggplants in Thai cooking are the round white or green ones about the size of a golf ball.

Thai eggplants are essential ingredients in curry dishes. In red curry, thai eggplants are quartered and cooked in the curry sauce where they become softer and absorb the flavor of the sauce.

In most Thai restaurants in the United States, Thai eggplants are usually replaced by the large purple eggplants common in that country, for fear that their unfamiliar nature may not appeal to Westerners.

Thai eggplants can be found in most Asian markets.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_eggplant
« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 12:35:00 am by Peter Gibbons »
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Re: vegetative cycle of eggplants
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2005, 12:25:32 am »
Eggplant Plant Care

Planting
Timing
Eggplants are one of the most heat-loving of all the vegetables we normally grow in the home garden: timing is, in our relatively short seasons, crucial. Obviously, seedlings for transplant is the only possible approach.

Although reliable times are hard to come by, and the numbers often quite contradictory from one source to another, it looks like eggplants want to spend 4 to 6 weeks as seedlings, then grow outdoors for perhaps 9 weeks (maybe more, if one is lucky). Our warmest nine weeks here are the months of July and August--our annual maximum is right around August first. Working back 6 weeks from a planting-out date of July first or so takes us to mid-May. (And that's more reason why selecting very early cultivars is important.) And we should prepare the bed soil with plastic mulch around June 15th.

Starting Seedlings
Optimum soil germination temperature for eggplant seeds is 86° F. Even after emergence, maintaining a soil temperature of about 70° is recommended. It is wise to start more seeds than one wants plants, then select the strongest seedlings at planting-out time.

The Bed
A well-drained sandy loam of pH 5.5 to 6.5 with high organic matter content is ideal for growing eggplants.

By general report, plastic mulches are a huge assist in growing eggplants in a shorter-season area.

Transplanting Out
We have already discussed planting dates. Note that around July first--the likeliest planting-out date--average night temperatures are scarcely 50° F. These rascals being so cold-sensitive means that we need to muster all the warmth weapons in our arsenal: plastic mulch to warm the ground, put in place a good couple of weeks before transplant time; row covers; and perhaps walls o'water (or makeshift substitutes, like plastic milk jugs filled with water and set amongst the seedlings). A Louisiana university (like many experience home gardeners) reported that eggplants responded very well to black-plastic mulch and to drip irrigation.

A plant spacing, in deep or raised beds, of about 18 inches probably works best, though somewhat closer spacings might be risked, especially for the smaller varieties.

It's especially important to water eggplants well right after transplanting, because--besides temperature--eggplants are also quite sensitive to water stress. (That's why drip irrigation is a wise approach.)

Growing
Water well; as noted above, drip irrigation works nicely for eggplants. Several occasional sidedressings of extra fertilizer are often recommended, owing to the plant's long growing season.

One source said that plants should be restricted to no more than 4 fruits, to make sure each reaches a good size and ripens properly.

Although eggplants are sturdy bushes, the fruits are heavy: support of some sort for them is a wise idea.

Fruits should be picked as they come ready, judged by their size. If the season lasts long enough, the plants will continue producing. (Seed savers should select for the longest-yielding specimens.) Harvest by cutting the stems--don't pull the fruits off. (Be aware that all green parts of the plant can be toxic--don't try eating the leaves.) Bitterness, a too-common complaint with store-bought eggplants, seems rare in home-grown, probably because they are picked before getting too big (a word to the wise).

Source: http://growingtaste.com/vegetables/eggplant.shtml
« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 12:33:45 am by Peter Gibbons »
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Offline Sunny Gardens®

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Re: vegetative cycle of eggplants
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2005, 12:40:54 am »
Dear Teri,

Here are some pages regarding different types of eggplants here at SunnyGardens.com:

'Ichiban'
'Black Bell'
Annual Eggplant
'Purple Blush'

Sincerely,

Peter
« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 12:45:21 am by Peter Gibbons »
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